Hate “Dieting”?  Focus on WHEN You Eat Instead of HOW MUCH You Eat

Hate “Dieting”? Focus on WHEN You Eat Instead of HOW MUCH You Eat

If you're a hater of calorie counting, you can rest assured you're not alone.  No offense to the calorie-counting lovers out there but.... you're weird and you probably know it. Wouldn't it be great if you could eat what you want and get healthier?  Maybe even lose some weight??  This is not an episode of the Twilight Zone.  If you're willing to keep track of time, you may very well be able to improve your health and lose weight by honoring your internal time clock.  In other words, eating in sync with your circadian rhythm, the ~24 cycle that all organisms follow.  Scientists won a Nobel Prize when they discovered there is a Master Clock in base of the brain called the SCN (the suprachiasmatic nucleus) that regulates all of our internal clocks.  Every system, process and cell in our bodies follow their specific time clock, and they don't take kindly to working over time.   Turns out, "we weren't paying enough attention to our circadian rhythm," says Dr. Pamela Peeke, author, speaker, athlete, and general badass.  I recently spoke to her  before her talk, "Is It Time to Eat Yet?" at the IDEA World Conference.  She says in a society where food is abundant 24/7, lifestyles are increasingly sedentary, and we don't get enough sleep, we are wreaking life-threatening havoc on mental and physical health.  In other words, "if you don't sync up with your internal body clock, you're in deep doo-doo."   One of the best known researchers in the field of eating and circadian rhythms - what is known as either "time restricted eating" (TRE) or "time...
Comparing the Fasting Mimicking Diet (ProLon) to Water Only Fasting

Comparing the Fasting Mimicking Diet (ProLon) to Water Only Fasting

Don't let the term FASTING scare you.  It's completely natural Whenever I merely mention the word "fasting" to someone who's interested in weight loss or improving their health, I can feel a palpable discomfort. I may detect a slight grimace or widening of the eyes or maybe a low groan.  It's not like I just walk around randomly talking about fasting.  But when people ask me which about diets I think are the best, I will always bring up Intermittent Fasting as a good option. After all, what is a "good diet?"  One that helps you lose weight (if you're overweight) and gives you long term health benefits, right? The research on fasting so far shows many benefits for health, weight loss and even longevity.  So, yes, I practice intermittent fasting as well. I do IF a fews days  a week for 16 - 17 hours and a couple of days at 12 - 13 hours.  If you're not sure what IF is, it's going at least 12 hours and up to a few days without food.  The goal is to limit your feeding window.  So on a 16 hour fast, for example, there are 8 hours in the day where you can eat your meals. There are all kinds of routines you can follow for IF. I think too many people have been sold on the "eat frequent small meals a day" hype.  I've written and talked about this before.  In short, I'm not a fan of it.  It's not natural. Our bodies weren't designed to eat all day long. It's been less than 100 years since we've had...
Time to Bust One of the MOST Annoying Nutrition Myths Ever!

Time to Bust One of the MOST Annoying Nutrition Myths Ever!

Small Frequent Meals or One to Two Larger Meals?  Which Is Really Better?  Let's Finally Put This Old Myth to Bed. I’m always amazed by what fitness and nutrition myths get perpetuated even long after the science has proven them wrong.  It would be nice if science journals had bigger PR budgets.  It would be great if celebrities stopped talking about what they really don't know about.  And, it would be awesome if so many of us didn't get our information from a splashy headline and a few paragraphs about a topic.  But, that's just not the world we live in. Speaking of myths touted by celebrities, this one has been around since Nancy Reagan was the First Lady: Eating 6 small meals a day (or eating every 3-4 hours) is better than less frequent meals.  The theory is that frequent feeding as it’s called, keeps your metabolism up so you burn more calories throughout the day and your blood sugar levels steady, preventing you from having energy swings and hunger in between meals. Sounds believable and makes sense, right?   Unfortunately science has proven this wrooooong.  Unless you have hypoglycemia or Type 2 Diabetes, less is more. Actually a fairly recent study shows it’s not even necessary for Type 2 Diabetics. I’ll get to that in a moment. But let’s just say, the diet advice your grandmother used to give you is actually sage advice from the old country.  “Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a queen and dinner like a pauper.”   And if the pauper actually skips dinner altogether, even better!  This is the polar opposite of the traditional American diet.   So let’s de-bunk the scientifically...
Infographic Share:  Benefits of Intermittent Fasting

Infographic Share: Benefits of Intermittent Fasting

I've written about my affinity for Intermittent Fasting before.  I'm in the 16:8 camp, meaning most days of the week, (about 4, sometimes 5), I don't eat for 16 hours.  I leave myself a "feeding window," as it's called, " of 8 hours.  For me it looks something like this: My Typical IF Schedule: Go to bed between 10 - 11 (or attempt to!). Wake up between 5:20 and 6:30 depending on the day's schedule I don't eat until 2pm, except coffee with a some MCT oil for the boost, some BCAAs (branch chain amino acid) powder supplement, in my water if I'm working out before I eat. Around 2:00 I have a large meal and maybe a snack like an RX Bar or apple with nut butter shortly after the meal. Around 8 or 8:30 I have dinner (there may be some other small snacks before dinner like nuts or fruit) If I'm still hungry, I will have a snack right before bed, like a bite of a protein bar. No more food after 10!  And I'm good until 2pm the next day.  It takes some getting used to, but 16 hours without food seems completely normal.  If I were doing this to lose weight, I would switch to eat a large breakfast and lunch instead of lunch and dinner.  Researchers on circadian rhythms have shown our metabolisms slow down in the evening.  In which case, I would stop eating at 4 or 5 pm and fast until 9am the next morning (preferably after a workout). Weight Loss and Health Benefits of IF: If you're considering this for...

Holiday Survival Guide: 10 Tactics for Less Stress, Weight Gain and More Joy This Season

Party season is in full swing and gaining weight seems to be almost inevitable.  It's a perfect storm of stress, diminished sleep, weakened immune systems and high calories foods and drinks all colliding into these few weeks.  Then, in a mad attempt to mitigate damage, the gym populations swell around January, but only temporarily however, as the majority give up after a few futile weeks or maybe a couple of months.  Good ol' Benji Franklin said it best, "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure."  Here's are 10 tactics you can put to use to survive the Holidays with minimal damage. Try these tips during the season that spreads more than just joy and good cheer: 1. Don't starve yourself all day before you go to a party. A binge meal can make you crave more of it the next day, especially if you're eating typical "party" food that's processed and sugary.  Eat something healthy and filling before you go to the party.  A small meal or large snack with protein is a great idea (preferably without added sugar).  Even a few sardines if you like them (try to learn to, they are great for you with their Omega 3's and high protein content - and you can share them with your dog if you can't eat a whole can." Once you're there, don't hang out close too the food.  If you've already eaten or are waiting for the meal to begin, it's a bad idea to stand near the snack trays.  Guaranteed you will eat more than you are actually hungry for. 2.  Use "spacers" if...