The Do’s and Don’ts of Getting Your New Year’s Resolutions Done

Everyone hates to fail.  Making those yearly resolutions come with the chance that you might not follow through. If you don't succeed, you may feel like you have failed yourself. But when your new year's resolutions are about improving your health or fitness, following just a few Do’s and Don’ts, can set you up for SUCCESS instead of letting yourself down. Here are the Do's and Don'ts you can put into practice now: Weight Loss Goals DON'T:  say, "I want to lose weight." DO:  Assign an exact number and completion date. EXAMPLE:  "I will lose 15 lbs. in 10 weeks" or "I will lose 25 lbs by Memorial Day." Put it in on your calendar or somewhere you can be reminded every day. HOW TO DO IT: Work backwards from that date to see how many pounds that is per week and how many calories mean you need to expend per day. Pick the most feasible approach for your lifestyle such as what types of workouts you might enjoy and what foods you need to cut back on (the ones you tend to binge on or that throw you off the wagon). When you set your time frame, make sure it's manageable and realistic (5 lbs of fat loss in a week is not, 1.5 lbs is). Then you can repeat and repeat until you get to the final goal. There are plenty of tracking apps that are perfect for this like, My Fitness Pal or Lose It!. Or go pro and get a trainer, nutritionist or health coach to create a personal plan for you. Weight loss is...

What Do You Need More: A Health Coach or a Fitness Trainer?

There's been a gradual shift happening over the last ten years on the professional side of the fit biz. All of the major certifying bodies have been pushing "specialty certifications." This is smart marketing.  Not just as an income source for these organizations to keep fitness professionals in their funnel, but because there really isn't a one size fits all approach to getting in shape.  It's unlikely that a 55 year old woman and a 35 year old guy will have the same goals and probably have different reasons for not attaining them.  One may gravitate towards studio cycling or boot camp style workouts and the other may prefer traditional weight training and Pilates.  Did you know that each of these workouts requires a different certification?  And that's just for trainers and instructors to work with clients who are already committed to going to the gym or studio, or, having a trainer come to them.  But there's a much larger issue at hand.  What about everybody else who still hasn't figured out how to stay committed or even find the motivation in the first place?  And what about the people who are working out but haven't learned to eat right yet so are undoing all their hard work by making the wrong food choices?  This is where a whole new segment of instructors and trainers are specializing.  Myself included.  It's called "Health Coaching."  It's an advanced certification meaning you already have to have at least a base certification.  Health Coaching addresses a clients fitness beyond the time they spend in the gym or studio.  It helps people address the...